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Musical throwback . . . Retro Rock at the Museum event organisers John Simpson (left) and Phillip Howe, of South Canterbury Museum, gesture to where the event will be held on the weekend, in front of the museum's Perth St address. PHOTO: GRETA YEOMAN

by Greta Yeoman

Timaru is set to enter a musical time warp this weekend.

The Retro Rock at the Museum event will be held outside South Canterbury Museum on Saturday, from 7pm.

Museum director Phillip Howe said the evening’s entertainment was the follow-up to The 70s Show concert held last year, however, the upcoming event would include music from the 1970s to the 1990s.

Mr Howe, who was organising the event along with John Simpson, said the concert would also include a fashion competition, for which attendees were invited to dress in the style of the decade of their choice.

He said there was plenty of musical and costume variety for those attending as music from the ’70s was at the peak of hippy culture, while ’80s music was big hair, shoulder pads and glam rock and disco and the ’90s provided a mix of sounds including the Seattle grunge scene.

“Everything from New Romantic to Duran Duran.”

He expected the event would run from 7pm to about “10.30ish”, depending on how the evening was going.

While Mr Howe had fielded suggestions from many residents following the first event to “do this every month”, the organising team had compromised by turning it into an annual event.

The three bands performing would include Black Sheep and The Burritos, which both performed last year, and newcomers Devil’s Handbrake – “which aren’t a heavy metal act”, Mr Howe said.

He also hoped organisers could use the projection of images from the museum as part of the event, which would be made easier by the increasingly darkening autumn evenings.

The evening of music and outfits was a good chance to look at “our musical heritage”, he said.

As Mr Howe told The Courier ahead of last year’s event, celebrating music from more-recent decades was an important part of wider history.

“It makes the point that history isn’t just Victorian history.”