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Making progress . . . Jean Lewis (left) presents Debbie Templeton-Page with the final $5000 needed for the new bronze sculpture to be placed on Timaru's piazza. The duo peer through a miniature replica of the sculpture, designed by Canterbury artist Llew Summers. PHOTO: ALEXIA JOHNSTON

Financial backing for Timaru’s newest bronze sculpture has been secured.

The sculpture, titled Encircling the Baroque, which is the work of Canterbury artist Llew Summers, was now fully funded, thanks to donations totalling $120,000.

Debbie Templeton-Page came up with the idea to have a bronze sculpture created for Timaru’s Bay Hill, at the top of the piazza.

She took the idea to the Art Advisory Group and it was approved, which meant the proposal could be taken to the council.

The Timaru District Council also approved the project, on the proviso it was to be fully funded before it was put in place.

Brett and Cindy King, along with Tony Page joined Mrs Templeton-Page on the project.

“And the fundraising started,” Mrs Templeton-Page said.

During the project, they have spent countless hours bringing the sculpture initiative to fruition.

Mrs Templeton-Page was pleased the next stage could now begin and wished to thank those who had made it possible.

Among the many people to support the project were Jean and Peter Lewis.

The couple were instigators of Timaru’s first Llew Summers public sculpture, Tranquility, next to the Timaru Library.

Mr and Mrs Lewis, formerly of Timaru but now living in Auckland, returned to South Canterbury for a visit last week.

They used the visit to donate $5000 in person after reading about the project online.

“When I looked on the computer I was overjoyed to see this was happening,” Mrs Lewis said.

Mrs Templeton-Page said many local people and companies had supported the cause, including one who wished to remain anonymous and Judith and Murray Purvis, whose donation secured them naming rights on the sculpture and a limited-edition bronze maquette.

“Thanks to everyone who has supported the project,” Mrs Templeton-Page said.

“It’s not only people that have given money. Lots of people have given their time and advice, which got us to put this together.”

Mrs Templeton-Page, and Rob and Amanda Tulley are also trustees of the Aoraki Art Charitable Trust, which has supported the project.

The next phase was determining when the sculpture would be put in place and unveiled.