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Messages of hope . . . Timaru musician and Roncalli College pupil Caitlin Bradley (17) is making an album for her Young Enterprise Scheme project - starring a variety of New Zealand music royalty. PHOTO: GRETA YEOMAN

by Greta Yeoman

A Timaru teen is set to have some of New Zealand’s top musicians on her debut album – and it is all for a good cause.

Roncalli College pupil Caitlin Bradley is creating a five-song EP for her Young Enterprise Scheme project, which will star The Exponents frontman Jordan Luck, The Crocodiles’ Rikki Morris, solo pop artist Jamie McDell and Waimate country musician Kaylee Bell.

The 17-year-old said the record would be made up of songs she would co-write and record with the musicians on the theme of “hope”.

“[They are] all collaborating with me on one song each,” she said of the album.

The Young Enterprise Scheme encourages high school pupils from across New Zealand to create, pitch and develop a business idea as part of their schoolwork.

She has partnered with the Cancer Society for the project after her grandmother died from cancer earlier this year.

“[It] inspired me to do something with the thing [we both] loved, which was music.”

The booklet with the album would include the lyrics, along with messages from people who had connections to those who had experienced cancer.

Those writing “messages of hope” included former Christchurch Boys’ High School head boy Jake Bailey who rose to fame after delivering a speech from his wheelchair about surviving cancer in 2015 and former Miss Universe star Lorraine Downes, whose partner, cricketer Martin Crowe, died from the disease in 2016.

She was set to write and record the album with McDell in Auckland next month, along with any of the other musicians who were available when she was there.

She hoped to record the album at The Lab in Auckland, which has been the recording choice for artists including Brooke Fraser, Don McGlashan and Elemeno P, as both Morris and McDell had connections to the studio.

She knew both Luck and McDell as her parents, Timaru itinerant music teachers Al and Sheryl Bradley, had co-ordinated several gigs for both of them over the years.

The pair had also taught Kaylee Bell from a young age, Caitlin said.

“It’s good to have connections through family.”

It would Caitlin’s first “proper” recording but she had had plenty of experience performing, including a weekly stint at Street Food Kitchen during New Zealand Music Month last month.

She said, initially, the album would be raising awareness for the work of the Cancer Society but she eventually hoped to donate some of the proceeds back to the organisation after costs had been met.

She hoped to have the album ready to launch by late July or early August, but people could follow the record’s progress via her Facebook page “Caitlin Joy”.